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The New Politics of the Handmade: Craft, Art and Design
is a forthcoming publication on contemporary craft politics edited by Anthea Black and Nicole Burisch.

The New Politics of the Handmade examines the role of contemporary art, craft and design as part of a dramatically shifting global economy. Current interest in virtually every aspect of the handmade appears in Do-It-Yourself, Craftivism, sustainable living, decolonial practices and aesthetics, and a new focus on labour and materiality in visual art and museums. The handmade has become inseparable from capitalist modes of production and consumption, and this change demands new understandings of objects, aesthetics and labour. New writing and artists projects by international scholars and practitioners look at the politics of scarcity, hoarding and sustainability, craftivism and ‘ethical’ consumption, urban space and new technologies, race, cultural heritage and sovereignty. The authors offer a radical rethink of the politics and economics of the handmade, and claim craft as a dynamic critical field for thinking through the most immediate issues of our time.

About the editors:

Anthea Black is an artist and cultural worker based in San Francisco and Toronto, Canada. Her writing has been published by Bordercrossings, No More Potlucks, Carleton University Art Gallery, and FUSE magazine where she was a contributing editor from 2008-2014. She has exhibited in Canada, the US, Norway and The Netherlands, and curated No Place: Queer Geographies on Screen and PLEASURE CRAFT. In 2012, she was the Viola Frey visiting scholar at California College of the Arts, where she is now an Assistant Professor in Printmedia and Graduate Fine Arts.

Nicole Burisch is a critic and curator based in Ottawa, Canada. Her writing has been published in Textile: The Journal of Cloth and Culture, Cahiers métiers d’art-Craft Journal, No More Potlucks, and dpi: Feminist Journal of Art and Digital Culture. She has worked with organizations such as Mentoring Artists for Women’s Art, Artexte, and Centre des arts actuels Skol and was a 2014-2016 Core Fellow Critic-in-Residence with the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Writings by Black and Burisch are included in The Craft Reader (BERG) and Extra/ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art (Duke University Press), Making Otherwise (Carleton University Art Gallery) and together they have lectured on craft, curating, and politics in Canada, the USA, and the UK.

Acknowledgements:
Black and Burisch wish to acknowledge the support of Canada Council for the Arts, Grants to Independent Critics and Curators, Ontario Arts Council Craft Projects – Connections, and The Center for Craft Creativity and Design.

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extra_cover“In Craft Hard Die Free: Radical Curatorial Strategies for Craftivism, Anthea Black and Nicole Burisch provide a brief international survey of activities which seek to deploy craft for the purposes of protest. Knitting, and other textile arts traditionally associated with communal crafting, plays the leading role. The concept of the ‘revolutionary knitting circle’ recalls the 1970s feminist use of a similar group exchange as a form of consciousness raising. Black and Burisch also cite the AIDS Quilt project of the 1980s as an important precursor for the present moment. So much for precedents, what about the future? Clearly, efficacy and identity are interwoven in this essay, which takes for granted another 70s concept–that the personal is political–and offers real-world strategies for [maintaining] the efficacy of symbolic craft. It is too early to say whether craftivism will have staying power in the cultural imagination, like the Arts and Crafts, studio and countercultural craft movements before it. But there is little doubt that Black, Burisch and their peers have breathed new life into this old set of ideas.”
-Glenn Adamson, The Craft Reader

Extra/ordinary: Craft and Contemporary Art has been reviewed in BUST Magazine, Bad at SportsAmerican Craft, Liminalities and will go to its second printing at Duke soon.

For a copy: https://www.dukeupress.edu/Extra-Ordinary/